Trick or Treat

A Halloween burial, along with tricks and treats in the family history.

My dad grew up knowing three of his four grandparents. You met many of them in an earlier post. His maternal grandfather, Ignatz, died a couple months before Dad was born, and it seems the family soon moved back to Glencoe, Illinos, to be near Ignatz’s widow, Dorothea. She lived as a widow for eleven years.

Dad was not quite eleven when Dorothea died, but he had vivid memories of her. She taught him how to play Rummy. It wasn’t a particularly “grandmotherly” activity, but it appealed to a young boy. It may have let him feel grown up (a sometimes rare commodity for a youngest child!), and I don’t think she let him win all the time, either.

As you can see from her funeral card, she died 29 October 1932 (a Saturday). The card didn’t tell you she was buried on 31 October (a Monday).

Yes, she was buried on Halloween! At least, I think so. A slight discrepancy exists. Unfortunately, her obituaries in the Chicago Tribune¹ are in the higher tier at Newspapers.com, so I can’t see what date was published, to resolve the issue. And I don’t recall if Dad metioned whether or not they missed going out to Trick or Treat, due to the death and funeral.

Dorothea was buried in the Schweiger plot in Sacred Heart cemetery, with her husband, son, and grandson. The plot card has only a 31 October 1932 date next to her name, not her death date.

Plot card, Sacred Heart Cemetery, Lee & Dundee Roads, Northbrook, Illinois. Section 2, Block 6, Lot 2.

Searching the Illinois Deaths and Stillbirths,² 1916-1947 index (FamilySearch.org or Ancestry.com), her burial was listed as 1 November 1932. The actual death certificate is not viewable online, so I can’t verify if the indexed date matched the certificate. Death certificates are completed before the burial, not at the time of or afterwards. It’s possible the informant didn’t actually know when the funeral would be scheduled, and put down November 1st (a Tuesday).

I’m slightly more inclined to trust the plot card, since it should have been created directly from the event. Having said that, fact checking the plot card turned up a couple discrepancies, so it isn’t perfect:

  • Anton Schweiger—the year should be 14, not 16. The 30 September date is in the Cook County, Illinois, Deaths Index, 1878-1922,³ but with a 1914 year more consistent with his 1914 death. I think the “16” on the paper is a typo. I’m not sure if the paper I have is a photocopy of the actual card, or a redrawing of it. If it was rewritten/retyped, that could easily be a typo.
  • Baby girl, stillborn. She was my cousin, Marilyn Victoria Busse. I had always heard she was stillborn, but when I located the record (not image) in the Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths Index, 1916-19474, I saw she also wasn’t named there (explaining no name on the plot card). More importantly, I discovered she had actually lived for 23 hours! That was a bit of a surprise. Her burial dates match, however.

So why do I think Dorothea’s date on the card is right, when I think Anton’s is wrong? Mistyping a single digit in the year is more likely than mistyping the month AND the day. I think that mistake would have been noticed and corrected.

Now that great-grandma is straightened out (sort of!), what else do I know about Dorothea, aside from being buried on Halloween and that she taught my dad to play Rummy?

She was born 26 March 1858, in Two Rivers, Wisconsin, the eighth child (of nine) of Peter Harry and Elisabetha Boullie; the 2nd child born in the USA. Their surname also shows up spelled Harré, Hary, and Hare, making it a little hard to search for, but had 2 syllables, and was pronounced like the “Harry” it morphed into.

One item that hadn’t really registered with me before now is that her father died when she was only 2½. I’ve been unable to locate Dorothea (and her family) in the 1860 census. It’s hard to misplace a family with six kids! They are AWOL for the 1870 census, too. While the two oldest children were married by then, the 4 youngest should have been with their mom. Even paging through the enumeration districts, or searching for the kids, didn’t turn them up. I don’t think Dorothea or her family moved away from Two Rivers, because several children got married there in the 1860s and 1870s. Their mother, Elisabeth, was still living there, alone, in 1880! They are simply lost for a while . . .

Dorothea finally resurfaced in 1880, working in Chicago as a servant in the Nussbaumer5 household. Apparently this was not an unusual situation. Rural Wisconsin farm girls regularly relocated to the Chicago North Shore as household help for those families. In this case, the husband and wife were both born in Germany, so I imagine having help who could understand if they lapsed into German would have been useful. The census recorded her as two years older, so either her employers didn’t know her actual age, and guessed, or she fudged it a little upwards to seem a little more mature when getting hired.

I don’t know if this was the only family she worked for—specific records for that don’t exist. Decades earlier, I had noted she had worked for a Kirsch family living in Niles Center (Skokie). I couldn’t locate that family in the 1880 census, so I can’t corroborate that. She didn’t marry Ignatz6 until April, 1885, so she had at least five years working, possibly more, if she moved to Illinois pre-1880.

After marrying Ignatz, she had 9 children in 15 years, and assisted with the restaurant. She and Ignatz were among the founding familes of Sacred Heart Church in Hubbard Woods (northeast section of Winnetka) in 1897, when St. Joseph’s parish (Wilmette) got too large. She was the first vice-president of the parish’s Married Ladies Soldality, organized 14 April 1898. When the school opened, her children attended.

She and her family lived above the butcher shop, and then the restaurant, until Ignatz died in 1921. The building and business were sold, and Dorothea moved a two-story house at 404 Woodlawn built by her son-in-law, Edward Haws, for the next eight years. The last two years of her life were spent living with her daughter, Rose. Somewhere in there, she taught my dad to play Rummy.

While there are still gaps in her timeline, and I obviously don’t know much about her personality, it would seem Dorothea worked hard throughout her life, much of it directed toward her family and her parish.

#52Ancestors


¹”Dorothea Schweiger, Glencoe Resident,” 30 October 1932, Newspapers.com: accessed 1 November 2019, record number: not given; citing original p. 14, entry for Dorothea SCHWEIGER, Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, online archive (http://www.newspapers.com).

²”Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths Index, 1916-1947″, database, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com), accessed 1 November 2019, entry for Dorothea SCHWEIGER, 26 March 1858, citing FHL microfilm 1684557, citing Public Board of Health, Archives, Springfield.

³”Cook County, Illinois, Deaths Index, 1878-1922″, database, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com), accessed 1 November 2019, entry for Anton SCHWEIGER, 28 September 1914, citing Illinois, Cook County Deaths 1878–1922, Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010; FHL# 1239987. Illinois Department of Public Health. Birth and Death Records, 1916–present. Division of Vital Records, Springfield, Illinois.

4“Illinois, Deaths and Stillbirths Index, 1916-1947”, database, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com), accessed 1 November 2019, entry for Baby Girl BUSSE, 25 May 1942, citing FHL microfilm 1953745, citing Public Board of Health, Archives, Springfield.

51880 U.S. census, population schedule, Illinois, Cook, Chicago, e.d. 189; Page 432D (printed), 28 (written) ; dwelling number 91; family number 155; line 12; Chs. NUSSBAUMER household; accessed 31 October 2019. Dora HARRY, age 24; NARA microfilm publication T9, roll 199; digital image, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com).

6“Cook County, Illinois, Marriages Index, 1871-1920”, database, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com), accessed 4 November 2019, citing “Illinois, Cook County Marriages, 1871-1920.” Index. FamilySearch, Salt Lake City, Utah, 2010. Illinois Department of Public Health records. “Marriage Records, 1871-present.” Division of Vital Records, Springfield, Illinois. Ignatz SCHWEIGER (25) and Thora HARRY (27).

Travel

“The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.”—Lao Tzu

With the closest relatives three and a half hours away, our children grew up in the car/van/minivan. Family visits, coupled with tent, then pop-up camper, finally Holiday Inn Express vacations, got them all to the lower 48 states by 1998. Alaska was added in 2010. Two children completed all fifty–with Hawaii on their own dimes (before Mike & I got there!)–prior to that. Family vacations were apparently time well-spent, because our children have lots of stories to tell (some more entertaining than others!) of those trips, and they all seem to enjoy travel as adults.

For my ancestors, the trip from Europe to America was not for relaxation. They uprooted themselves from the life they knew and traveled to a completely foreign place. Both Mike’s and my families are relatively new to North America, with only a handful of ancstors showing up in the 1850 census records. No Mayflower Society or DAR/SAR memberships in this house!

I’ve not had terribly good luck locating ships’ passenger lists. Part of the difficulty has to do with:

  • inexact emigration dates
  • non-existent naturalization records–or incomplete information on them
  • lack of ships’ records from that time
  • difficulty in reading the records that do exist!
  • extremely vague descriptions of the passengers. With a somewhat common name, is that “farmer from Germany” mine, or someone else’s?

Few of my ancestors passed down information about their emigration. When I expressed surprise about that 45 years ago to the grandaunts & granduncles (their parents were born in the USA, but they had aunts and uncles–and grandparents–born in the “old country”), their reply was that everyone was trying so hard to fit in and become American, they didn’t talk about the past. It’s also possible those memories saddened them, so not talking about it made it easier.

But we do have snippets of their adventures. My great-grandmother, Dorothea Hary/Harre/Haré/Harry (just a few of her variations!) was born in Wisconsin, but her parents and older siblings were not. I still haven’t found the passenger list for the ship they came over on in 1854. But shortly after I got married, I was contacted by a Mr. Leslie Larson. His wife descended from Dorothea’s older sister, Margaret. At some point the story about the last leg of their journey, after arriving in New York, was recorded. I don’t know who the story originated from (possibly Margaret?), or who wrote it down, but this is what I read:

“Great grandfather [Peter] did not have enough money when he arrived in New York to bring all the family to Two Rivers. Great Grandmother HARRÉ [Elisabetha] lived in New York and worked at a hotel for at least a couple of months until she had earned enough money to pay hers and the children’s fare to Cooperstown near Two Rivers. She carried Peter and kicked Johnny to keep him from lagging behind, and they walked all the way from Cooperstown to Two Rivers, a distance of approximately 15 miles.” (from narrative obtained from Leslie Larson)

Peter & Elisabeth (Boullie/Bullea) Harré arrived in New York some time in May, 1854. I don’t know exactly what route or method they used to reach Wisconsin. The Erie Canal was completed in 1825, so all they needed to do was get to the starting point. While cross county train travel was not available yet, apparently New York State had several railroads linking different parts of the state.¹ Taking a train to the canal wouldn’t have been difficult. Or they could have traveled up the Hudson by boat.

Water transportation would have been much easier and quicker than overland travel through the relatively new (and still rough around the edges) states of Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. From the description, it sounds like Peter went on ahead–probably to secure land, get seeds planted, start on a house, maybe? The oldest of their four (at that point–two daughters had died before they left) children was under age 10:

  • Mary–9 1/2
  • William–8
  • John–5
  • Peter–barely a year

None of them were old enough to be helpful to him. It made sense for them to stay with their mom while she earned the traveling money.

Arriving in Two Rivers, she was still not home free! According to Google, (click for map) it’s a 16.3 mile walk to Cooperstown, and takes just under 5.5 hours–following present-day roads. I can’t begin to imagine doing that with children and questionable roads! Peter wouldn’t have known exactly when to expect them, so couldn’t have been there to meet them in Two Rivers and give them a ride back. Did Elisabeth have to deal with luggage, too? Hopefully not, if she was carrying the baby! Were that left in town, for Peter to drive in for later, with a wagon? So many questions, so few answers . . .

Sometimes in genealogy, we get so focused on the ship crossing the Atlantic, we forget that wasn’t the end of the road. Interstates didn’t connect places. No Holiday Inn Expresses to stay in, serving cinnamon rolls. And no Game Boys (or whatever the current equivalent is) to keep the kids from complaining during the trip.

As far as I know, none of my ancestors kept diaries, documenting their travels. I’m grateful to have this one description to give me at least a taste of what it may have been like for the others.

#52Ancestors


¹ Website describing state-wide train service in New York beginning in 1830: click here