Map It Out

“I wisely started with a map.”–J. R. R. Tolkien

While I like maps, and reference them regularly as I research, I already used up my better examples in other posts:

So this week had me stymied. It didn’t help that I was dealing with a furnace and air conditioner replacement, a retaining wall rebuild, and a continuation of reseeding the yard. Blogging time was non-existant. As I pried out crabgrass Friday afternoon, I remembered the email I’d received mid-week, from someone wondering if she was related to me. Well, actually, to Mike.

She had done a Google search on the Kukler surname, and my blog popped into the results, with Brother (the most recent) leading the way. She provided enough information (great grandfather’s and 2nd great grandfather’s names) to tell me she is connected to another (not Mike’s) Kukler family I had in my file.

In searching for his Kuklers, I ran across records for other, unknown, Kuklers in the Detroit area. It seemed prudent to keep track of them as little “islands,” in case they ended up connecting to his, later on. In my reply to her, explaining that I don’t know whether or not she is related, I listed the strays I accumulated. I hoped that maybe she knew if/how some of them might fit together. I have not heard back, yet.

It occurred to me, though, that maybe a map plotting out the assorted Kuklers might be useful. It won’t create connections directly, but it could help me visualize where they lived in relation to one another. That might make a connection more—or less—likely. Not coming from Detroit, myself, the streets and neighborhoods are not familar to me. This could improve that situation.

So the 2-day project plan is to plot Mike’s Kuklers (in one color) from the addresses provided in various records (census, draft registrations, death certificates). I’ll then move on to the various “islands,” changing color for each one. I should end up with a map showing who was living where.

One unplanned complication arose: address renumbering. Like Chicago did in 1909, Detroit underwent renumbering in 1920 (effective in 1921). So all the older addresses had to be adjusted to their new number. This became a scavenger hunt, as well as a plotting exercise!

The 1870 census (Frank Kukler’s and Anna Plansky’s first one, I believe) has no address: just “2nd precinct, 6th ward.” I was able to find an 1870 map. I believe the bold numbers might indicate wards, placing the 6th ward as the NNE pie wedge. I couldn’t find precinct maps, though, so I’ll use the 1880 pin for 1870 and 1880.

Pins marking residence locations. “Truck” icons are Mike’s grandfather (Frank C.), “factory” icons are his great grandfather, Frank J., and some of his siblings. Those are all green. Lighter green is Anna Kukler, married to Peter Kaiser, who I suspect may be related. Yellow is for the new contact’s ancestors in Hamtramck, Michigan. The “one-offs” in different colors are the stray Kuklers I’ve run across.

After 2 days of battling house renumbering, street names changes, and map disruptions due to the expressways criss-crossing the city, I have the map you see, above. What, if anything, does it tell me? There seem to be several definite residence clusters, but none of them are really very far from each other. Some of the movement probably comes from job opportunities.

If I were to plot addresses past 1942, I’d probably notice a fanning out, or ripple effect that already started as development moved out from downtown.

Some of the outliers (red question mark) may be less likely to have a connection to our Kuklers, but it doesn’t entirely rule that out. Obviously more research is needed to try and determine a definite link or not.

So, was this a useful exercise? I think so.

  • I double checked some of the information I had.
  • I learned far more about Detroit than I ever wanted to . . .
  • I have a new list of resources! (below)
  • I now have a better handle on how Mike’s family moved around—or didn’t move around, but their address changed, anyway!

As new Kukler records with addresses pop up, I will add pins to the map to see how they play out with the earlier ones. It may not give me a direct answer, but it seems to add a little clarity to the situation.

#52Ancestors


This week has more of a Bibliography than Footnotes. These were sites I found to be useful in placing pins on my map. Some of the images I used are linked above, but I wanted something more “formal” in case I needed to look up something else, later. I’m getting older, and there’s too much crammed in my brain for me to remember it all . . . .

Granzo, T. (2019). Detroit Streets. [online] Historydetroit.com. Available at: http://historydetroit.com/places/streets.php [Accessed 29 Sep. 2019]. Another site I used to figure out the streets.

Hill, A. (2019). DETROITography. [online] Detroitography.files.wordpress.com. Available at: https://detroitography.files.wordpress.com/2014/12/det-city-services-1870.jpg [Accessed 28 Sep. 2019]. Historic map showing wards.

Mitchell, S. (2019). Detroit. – David Rumsey Historical Map Collection. [online] Davidrumsey.com. Available at: https://www.davidrumsey.com/luna/servlet/detail/RUMSEY~8~1~30510~1140037:Plan-of-Detroit—Entered—–1879- [Accessed 28 Sep. 2019]. Historic maps–showing old roads, particularly prior to expressways changing/eliminating roads.

Morse, S. (2019). One-Step Webpages. [online] Stevemorse.org. Available at: https://stevemorse.org/census/changes/DetroitChanges2.htm [Accessed 29 Sep. 2019]. Detroit street name changes and renumbering.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s